May Day noise demo at Toronto South Detention Centre

For May Day this year, despite the current limitations on some of our traditional activities, we wanted to safely take to the streets. It was a perfect opportunity to do a demonstration we’d been thinking about at Toronto South Detention Centre. Toronto South, nicknamed “Guantanamo South”, is a horrific place, and an especially dangerous place to be during a pandemic.

Just as dark fell on May 1st, we gathered in a parking lot nearby to go over the plan, and one person gave this statement:

“It’s May Day, or International Workers Day, a day to celebrate anti-capitalist struggles and fight for our collective freedom. The struggle against prisons is tied to so many other fights we’re engaged in, as a threat and punishment that keeps us trapped in the current system. […]” Read More …

No Pandemic Profiteering: Bank Sabotage Action in Downtown Toronto

In response to the call for decentralized May Day actions, some Toronto anarchists went for a delightful ride on a clear night in late April to let banks know that we are watching and that we are ready and willing to act. Despite most branches being closed due to Covid-19, we managed to find a few branches that were continuing to open for customers. We visited several banks, gluing the locks, and spray painting messages on the concrete or exterior facade as appropriate. Our messages centred around their abysmal failure to show even a modicum of compassion amid widespread income loss among its clients.  Read More …

Opportunity in Every Crisis: A Call For Decentralized May Day Actions

However you tell the tale of May Day, one thing is consistent: it is a time people gather together, to march in the streets or to celebrate a new spring. Although most of us are enjoying the warmer weather blowing in, we are mostly stuck in our homes. Reading the news, trying to figure out the right thing to do, watching May 1st creep closer and wondering what it will look like this year if we can’t take over downtown and revel in May Day as we have come to know it: a celebration of anticapitalism.

Life is an evolving story, an ever-changing landscape. We have always had to adapt and shift our tactics to new realities as they crop up. This is no different. The context in which we find ourselves is affected by both the coronavirus and the repressive actions taken by the state around it, but the need for resistance is still just as present. Read More …

From Embers: New Content in May 2019

From Embers is a regular anarchist podcast produced in Kingston, Ontario. We produce a few episodes each month about actions and projects going on in so-called Canada that inspire us, or about topics that we think will be relevant to anarchists living north of the border. We are a proud member of the Channel Zero Anarchist Podcast Network. Read More …

Reflections on Toronto May Day 2019

May Day in Toronto this year was marked by a couple of rallies, plenty of rain, and one bloody guillotine. It was my first May Day in Toronto, and I wasn’t really sure what to expect, but was excited for the opportunity to be explicitly and confrontationally anti-capitalist in the streets. May Day to me is about celebrating labour victories of years past and fighting for a world free from all forms of oppression. I’d heard that the main feature of Toronto May Day is the evening march, organized by a coalition of organizations, and that most people came with their union or political group. Read More …

Hamilton May Day: Causing some shit and wearing our politics proudly

Anti-Authoritarian & Anti-Capitalist Mayday 2019 Reportback

Anyone who lives in Hamilton knows that JSquare is truly a temple of precarious jobs. Maybe you’ve put in your hours sweeping yellow skittles off the theatre floor or selling cigar boxes at one of the telemarketing firms; maybe you have a friend who pushed data plans at one of the cell booths or slung Mooseheads at the Honest Lawyer. Whatever your experience of Jackson Square, you can perhaps imagine how satisfying it might be to march with a crew of 40 radicals through the mall, spreading May Day cheer and working class solidarity to all those stuck working on this International Worker’s Day.

This year’s May Day began two months prior with an attempt at coalition organizing. It was a real possibility, but for the presence of a small yet committed group of authoritarian communists (working under different banners of the Revolutionary Communist Party) whose behavior during the meetings rendered the word “solidarity” meaningless. Thus proving once again that there can be no solidarity with those who seek power over us, those who worship the murderous dictators of history, those who follow party lines instead of their own ethics. And so anarchists went our own way, calling for an anti-authoritarian & anti-capitalist march on our own terms. Read More …

Roundup of May Day events!

There are a number of May Day events happening across the region on Wednesday May 1 2019, marking International Workers’ Day by taking the streets, celebrating in parks, and remembering the ways that capitalism underpins so many of the problems people face every day. From east to west, here are the events we’ve received details about from their organizers and a short excerpt from each callout. Got a May Day Read More …

Regarding KW May Day and Socialist Fight Back

From KW May Day Collective By Adam, member of the KW May Day Collective It seems necessary to respond to some of things outlined in Socialist Fightback’s statement about KW May Day. As a member of the KW May Day collective I can certainly speak to some of our feelings, thoughts and rationales around this. My perspective is informed in part by various interactions with Fightback generally over the last Read More …

Report-back from May Day in Kingston

Anonymous Submission to North Shore Counter-Info “Oh wow, we’re just, like, taking up the street,” I hear the thirty-something guy behind me exclaim to his friend as we take off. “Holy shit this is awesome,” his friend replies. Slightly more experienced folks from the crowd move instinctively to the side and back to stop traffic as we move out of the park and onto the road, heading towards Kingston’s main Read More …